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WAR & PEACE
WAGES --- WAITING
WALES --- WALKING

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WAR & PEACE (THIS SECTION IS LINKS ONLY)

see:

AIR FORCE

ALLIANCES

APPEASMENT

ARMY

ATOM BOMB

WINSTON CHURCHILL

COLD WAR

CONQUEST

DEFEAT & DEFENSE

DIPLOMACY

DRAFT DODGERS

DUNKIRK

EMPIRE, ENEMIES

FORCE

GLORY

GUANTANAMO

HEROES

HIROSHIMA

IRAQ

DOUGLAS MACARTHUR

MARINES

MEMORIAL DAY

MILITARISM

NAVY

NUCLEAR WAR, NUCLEAR WEAPONS

PACIFISM

PATRIOTISM

PEACE, PEARL HARBOR

PROPAGANDA

REVOLUTION

FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT

SELF-DEFENSE

SOLDIERS

SURRENDER

TREATIES

VICTORY

WAR (THE CIVIL), (THE GULF), (THE KOREAN)

WAR (THOUGHTS ABOUT) PART 1

WAR (THOUGHTS ABOUT) PART 2

WAR (VIETNAM)

WAR (WWI)

WAR (WWII)

WEAPONS




WAGES

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see "WORK" for related links

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$25 million - amount of money made by TV icon
Judge Judy in 2005, according to a survey for
National Payroll Week.

$200,000 - Amount former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor earned when she
served.

$350,000 - Amount of money made by actor
Will Ferrell annually on "Saturday Night Live"
when he portrayed President George W. Bush.

$400,000 - Amount of money paid annually to
President George W. Bush.

--_Las Vegas Business Press_ [19 March 2007]

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The Right Minimum Wage: $0.00

There's a virtual consensus among economists that the minimum wage
is an idea whose time has passed. Raising the minimum wage by a
substantial amount would price working poor people out of the job
market.

--editorial in the _New York Times_ [14 January 1987]

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$19,915 - Average annual income for a person age 18 and older
holding less than a high school diploma.

$29,448 - Average annual income for a person age 18 and older
holding a high school diploma.

$54,689 - Average annual income for a person age 18 and older
holding a bachelor's degree.

$79,946 - Average annual income for a person age 18 and older
possessing a master's, professional or doctoral degree.

--U.S. Census Bureau [2000]

-

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emolument (noun) [-'mah-ly-mnt or ee-'mah-ly-mnt]
Compensation or perquisites received for employment.




WAITING

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see: "DELAY"
see: "INDECISION"
see: "IDLENESS"
see: "INACTIVITY"
see: "LAZINESS"
see: "REST"


All things come to those who
wait if they don't die first.
--Charles Dickens (18121870)
English novelist.
"All The Year Round"

Ah, 'all things come to those who wait,'
(I say these words to make me glad),
But something answers, soft and sad,
'They come, but often come too late.'
--Mary Singleton [ne Lamb] (18431905) [later Baronness Currie]
English poet.

How men hate waiting while their wives shop for clothes
and trinkets; how women hate waiting, often for much of
their lives, while their husbands shop for fame and glory.
--Thomas Szasz (1920 )
American psychiatrist.
_The Second Sin_ [1973]

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queue (noun) [kyu]
A line, a row of people.




Click picture to ZOOM
WALES

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see "PLACES" for related links


"Have you ever been to Wales, Baldrick?"

"No, but I'd often thought I'd like to"

"Well don't, it's a ghastly place. Huge gangs of tough
sinewy men roam there terrifying people with their close
harmony singing. You need half a pint of phlegm in your
throat just to pronounce the placenames. Never ask
directions in Wales, Baldrick. You'll be washing spittle
out of your hair for a fortnight."

--Blackadder (Richard Curtis and Ben Elton)
more at: http://www.geocities.com/TelevisionCity/8889/rowanint.htm

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The Scots love to roam the world; the Welsh feel
homesick if they have to go as far as London. ...
A Scotsman may speak nostalgically of Scotland,
but a Welshman will actually wish to return to
Wales.
--Anthony Glyn (1922-1998)
_The British: Portrait of a People_ [1970]

Wales! Wales! land of the slugs and the snails!
In buckets and pails
The rain falls on Wales
And when it's not raining
It hails.
--Sir A.P. (Alan Patrick) Herbert (1890-1971)
English writer and humorist

The Welsh are a nation of male-voice choir
lovers whose only hobbies are rugby and
romantic involvement with sheep.
--Lenny Henry

Each section of the British Isles has its own
way of laughing, except Wales which doesn't.
--Stephen Butler Leacock (1869-1944)
Canadian humorist

Among our ancient mountains,
And from our lovely vales,
Oh, let the prayer re-echo:
God bless the Prince of Wales!
--George Linley (1798-1865)
English songwriter
"God Bless the Prince of Wales" [1862 song],
translated from the Welsh original by J.C. Hughes (1837-1867)

The way to make a Welch-man thirst for blisse
And say his prayers on his knees:
Is to perswade him, that most certaine 'tis,
The Moone is made of nothing but greene Cheese.
And hee'l desire of God no greater boone,
But place in heaven to feed upon the Moone.
--John Taylor,
_All the Works of John Taylor_ [1630]

The land of my fathers.
My fathers can have it.
--Dylan Thomas (1914-1953)
Welsh poet,
in "Adam" [December 1953]

There are still parts of Wales where the only
concession to gaity is a striped shroud.
--Gwyn Thomas (1913-1981)
Welsh novelist and dramatist,
_Punch_ [18 June 1958]

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The Russians were attempting to set up a spy ring in Wales. A top
KBG agent called Vladimir was told, 'Proceed to Cardiff and take
the branch line to Abercwmscwt. There you will meet a man called
Jones. You will say to him, 'The daffodils are blooming early this
year.' He will tell you how to set up the spy ring.'

Vladimir finally arrives at Abercwmscwt and asks the ticket
collector, 'Do you know a man called Jones?'

The ticket collector replies, 'Well it depends which Jones you
want. There's Jones the Bread, Jones the Milk, Jones the Death
(he's the funeral director). In fact, my name is Jones.' 'The
daffodils are blooming early this year,' says Vladimir. 'Oh,'
says the ticket collector, 'it's Jones the Spy you want.'





WALKING

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see: "ENTERTAINMENT, HOBBIES, & LEISURE ACTIVITIES"
see "TRAVEL" for related links


Give me the clear blue sky over my head, and the green
turf beneath my feet, a winding road before me, and a
three hours' march to dinner--and then to thinking!
--William Hazlitt (1778-1830)
English essayist.
"On Going a Journey"

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An even more abandoned delight to be learned from our
forefathers is taking walks. You will begin to recapture
the natural rhythms of the body. The mere act of walking
attunes us with the earth and the air. And it gives us
an opportunity to think.

Aristotle's disciples were called the Peripatetics, or Walkers,
because they walked when they wanted to think--they found
that walking helped thinking. It does. Especially when you
need to work out a problem.

--Peter Kreeft

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...I am a confirmed saunterer. I love to be set down
haphazard among unknown byways; to saunter with open
eyes, watching the moods and humors of men, the shapes
of their dwellings, the criss-cross of their streets.
It is an implanted passion that grows keener and keener.
The everlasting lure of round-the-corner, how fascinating
it is!
--Christopher Morley (1890-1957)
American journalist, novelist, and poet.
"Sauntering"

[Gustave Flaubert said] "One can only think or write
while sitting". Here I have got you, you nihilist!
A sedentary life is the real sin against the Holy Spirit.
Only those thoughts that come by walking have any
value.
--Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900)
German classical scholar, philosopher, and critic of culture.
_The Twilight of the Idols_, [1888],
"Maxims and Missiles"

Pick the right grandparents, don't eat or drink too much,
be circumspect in all things, and take a two-mile walk
every morning before breakfast.
--Harry S. Truman (1884-1972)
American Democratic statesman, President of the U.S. [1945-1953].
Prescription for reaching the age of 80, remark to
reporters on his 80th birthday, Washington, D.C. [8 May 1964].

The church is near but the roads are icy.
The tavern is far but I'll walk carefully.
--Ukrainian Proverb

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maunder MON-dur, intransitive verb:
1. To talk incoherently; to speak in a rambling manner.
2. To wander aimlessly or confusedly.
Two drunken couples... maunder in an all-too-familiar vein about love.
--Anatole Broyard,
"New York Times" [15 April 1981]

peregrination (noun) [pe-r-gri-'ney-shn]
A long, meandering journey or walk; a course of travel.
The word implies long, drawn-out travels.

peripatetic pair-uh-puh-TET-ik, adjective:
1. Of or pertaining to walking about or traveling from place to place; itinerant.
2. Of or pertaining to the philosophy taught by Aristotle (who gave
his instructions while walking in the Lyceum at Athens), or to his
followers.
noun:
1. One who walks about; a pedestrian; an itinerant.
2. A follower of Aristotle; an Aristotelian.
Ex.: I was born in Italy, my sister on the west coast of Canada,
because my father was pursuing a peripatetic career as an artist.
--Anna Shapiro, "USA Today," [13 July 2000]


end page





| UGLY - UNICORNS | UNHAPPINESS | UNIONS - USELESS | VACATION - VENGENCE | VENICE - VICTORY | VIGILANCE - VIRGINITY | VIRTUE - VULGARITY | WAR & PEACE -- WALKING | WAR (THE CIVIL) - WAR (THE REVOLUTIONARY) | WAR (THOUGHTS ABOUT) - PAGE 1 (A-M) | WAR (THOUGHTS ABOUT) - PAGE 2 (N-Z) | WAR (VIETNAM) | WAR (WORLD WAR I) | WAR (WORLD WAR II) PAGE 1 (A-M) | WAR (WORLD WAR II) PAGE 2 (N-Z) | WASHINGTON (D.C.) - WEAK/WEAKNESS | WEALTH - WEASELS | WEATHER - WELLS (H.G.) | WEST (THE OLD/WILD) - WILDE (OSCAR) | WILL - WINNING | WINTER - WISDOM | WISHING - WIVES | WOMEN - WOMEN'S LIB | WOMEN'S RIGHTS - WORDS | WORK - WORLD | WORLD TRADE CENTER & PENTAGON DISASTER, 11 SEPTEMB | WORRY - WRONG | WRITING | YESTERDAY - ZOOS |
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