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BROADWAY
BROTHERLY LOVE

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BROADWAY

see: "ACTORS" for related links
see: "PLACES" for related links


...The original "Broadway" theater was the Victoria, opened in 1899 by Oscar Hammerstein, "the first of Times Square's masters of shameless hyperbole." Hammerstein made brief flings at high-minded drama before bowing to the box office and making the Victoria a palace of riotous vaudeville. Within the decade, there were some 40 theaters operating in and around Times Square, specializing in generally respectable but decidedly middlebrow fare. The real action, however, may have been in the "lobster palaces" where fat men ate huge meals and waitresses were often expected to double as sexual partners. The link between Times Square and convention-flouting sex was there from the beginning.

Broadway's true Golden Age, however, was kicked off with the dance craze of 1915. The great names are Flo Ziegfeld and Irving Berlin. Ziegfeld's "Midnight Frolic," a companion piece to his Follies, was a nightly post-theater dance party for 600 guests on the rooftop garden of the New Amsterdam. "The women wore narrow, clinging dresses and the men wore top hats and tails. They drank champagne and ate pistachio nuts while the masterful Ziegfeld ran his sparkling parade of beauties across the stage and into the crowd."

Over the next decade, a host of Ziegfeld imitators -- Earl Carroll's Vanities, Garrick's Gaieties, George White's Scandals -- ratcheted up the glitz and bare female flesh to the point where Ziegfeld started to put clothes back on his girls. The music was terrific and the wit as effervescent as the wine -- it was the age of the Gershwins, Rodgers and Hart, Porter, Berlin (as always), the Paul Whiteman band, George S. Kaufman, Robert Benchley and the Algonquin circle. But underlying it all was the criminal culture of the speakeasy -- "essentially a bordello with music and dancing" -- presided over by the murderous Arnie Rothstein and the gangland ethic packaged and sanitized by Damon Runyon.

Depression, repeal and the rise of Hollywood tolled the end of an era. By the 1950s the middlebrow review pioneered by Ziegfeld was the province of Ed Sullivan. There was still kick left in Broadway, however, for as it decoupled from popular culture it finally became a home for serious theater. The 1930s saw the rise of the Group Theater -- the great names are Clifford Odets, Eugene O'Neill, Maxwell Anderson, Lillian Hellman, Elia Kazan. But as the area slid into decay, the legitimate theaters became precarious stepping stones through the sewer of the violent street and drug culture of the 1970s. ...

--Charles R. Morris, reviewing James Traub's
_The Devil's Playground_ in the "Wall Street Journal"

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BROTHERLY LOVE

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see: "FRIENDSHIP"
see: "THE HUMAN RACE" for other related links


It is an old saying, that charity begins at home; but this is no reason
it should not go abroad. A man should live with the world as a citizen
of the world; he may have a preference for the particular quarter or
square or even alley, in which he lives, but be should have a
generous feeling for the welfare of the whole.
--Richard Cumberland (16311718)
English theologian, Anglican bishop, and philosopher of ethics.

The universe is but one great city, full of beloved ones,
divine and human, by nature endeared to each other.
--Epictetus (55135)
Greek philosopher.

A low capacity for getting along with those near us often
goes hand in hand with a high receptivity to the idea of
the brotherhood of men.
--Eric Hoffer (19021983)
American longshoreman, philosopher,
and author who received the Presidential
Medal of Freedom in 1982.

My affections were first for my own country,
and then, generally, for all mankind.
--Thomas Jefferson (17431826)
American statesman and president [18011809].
In a letter to Thomas Law [15 January 1811].

The brotherhood of man is evoked by particular men according to
their circumstances. But it seldom extends to all men. In the name
of our freedom and our brotherhood we are prepared to blow up
the other half of mankind and to be blown up in our turn.
--R.D. Laing (19271989)
Scottish psychiatrist.
_The Politics of Experience_ [1967], ch. 4

Oh, the poor folks hate the rich folks,
And the rich folks hate the poor folks,
All of my folks hate all of your folks,
It's American as apple pie.
--Tom Lehrer (1928 )
American songwriter and satirist.
"National Brotherhood Week" [1965 song]

[Obi-Wan Kenobi, played by Alec Guinness, speaking:]
Mos Eisley Spaceport. You will never find a more retched
hive of scum and villainy.
--George Lucas (1944 )
American screenwriter and producer.
_Star Wars_ [1977] (screenplay)

There is a destiny that makes us brothers:
None goes his way alone:
All that we send into the lives of others
Comes back unto our own.
--Edwin Markham (18521940)
American poet and lecturer.
"A Creed" [1900], _Poems_,
ed. Charles L. Wallis [1950].

It's silly to go on pretending that under the skin we
are all brothers. The truth is more likely that under
the skin we are all cannibals, assassins, traitors,
liars, hypocrites, poltroons.
--Henry Miller (18911980)
American novelist and essayist.

We are all brothers under the skin and I,
for one, would be willing to skin humanity
to prove it.
--Ayn Rand (19051982)
Russian-born American writer.
_The Fountainhead_ [1943]

Whoever seeks to set one race against another
seeks to enslave all races.
--Franklin D. Roosevelt (18821945)
American Democratic statesman and President [19331945].

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers.
--William Shakespeare (15641616)
English dramatist.
_King Henry V_ [15981599], act 4, sc. 3

What men call social virtues, good fellowship, is commonly but
the virtue of pigs in a litter, which lie close together to keep each
other warm.
--Henry David Thoreau (18171862)
American essayist, poet, and practical philosopher.
_Journal_ [1906] "23 October 1852"

The brotherhood of Man presupposes the
fatherhood of God.
--Arnold Toynbee (18891975)
English historian.
_A Study of History, 1934-1939_


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